Why You Need To Memorize Every Day

memorize every dayDear Memorizers,

Why memorize every day?

There are at least three reasons.

1. Memorizing every day will keep the oils of your mind geared (if I can get a way with such a goofy spoonerism). Imagine a baseball champion heading out onto the field after a long winter with zero practice. Yes, he might still have some chops, but he’ll be rusty and quite possibly ineffective. Worse, he’ll probably suffer the next day because he put himself under such duress without being properly prepared. It doesn’t have to be, but it could well be demotivating. Why take that risk?

2. Vocabulary development is attracted to speed & consistency. It’s true. The more often and the more quickly you practice, the more connections you see and the more you can leverage those connections to express yourself in the language and understand what you read and here. This stimulates even more excitement for further practice, and thus greater results. And the more your practice, the better your imagination becomes, the more vibrant and vivid, and with such incredible magnetic velocity.

3. The numbers. As we learned yesterday, we reduce 80% of the workload by using mnemonics. We also increase the chances of retaining the vocabulary by 100% so long as we engage in rehearsal and don’t fall prey to the anxiety that can arise when we’re unable to retrieve a word.

Let’s face it:

We often can’t find the words we want in our mother tongue either. It’s normal to forget words once in awhile, especially when we’re hunting for the “right” word. And that’s where having an advanced vocabulary really kicks in. We don’t always need the “right” word because we’ve got other options. We’re never out of sorts because other options are just a Memory Palace journey away.

Look, if you can’t find the time to memorize a word from your target vocabulary, don’t fret it. Find something else to memorize to practice the skills and keep the techniques fresh. Memory champions do this all the time with random numbers, randomized cards from a deck of cards, dates, alphabetized city names, etc.

Here are some other ideas that you can use when you’re out and about:

1. Ask someone their birth date and memorize it.

2. Ask a cashier their name and memorize it.

3. Memorize the prices of the food as you’re shopping at the grocery store. Bonus points if you tabulate while you memorize.

4. Notice license plates and memorize them.

5. Memorize street names as you walk around a new neighborhood (I would say as you drive around a new neighborhood, but that could be dangerous).

6. Listen to music and memorize lyrics.

7. Dig in your cell phone for the most important person you know and memorize their phone number (because chances are that in 2013, you have no clue what it is).

8. Memorize the ingredients of the soda or juice you’re drinking while waiting for the bus.

9. Memorize the schedule of the bus you’re waiting for.

10. Memorize the color of the clothing of the first 10 people you see while finding your seat on the bus.

There are countless little exercises you can make for yourself. Some are testable, others are not. But all of them will increase your speed, accuracy and the power of your imagination, so that when you sit down with your dictionary, your mind is going to be a very powerful machine indeed. You’ll be like the baseball champion who spent all winter lifting weights and whacking balls instead of snoozing in front the TV.

Until next time, make sure to teach someone else what you’ve learned about memorization. It’s one of the best ways to make the world a better place.

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